logo

Application of Mössbauer spectroscopy to the study of tannins inhibition of iron and steel corrosion

Application of Mössbauer spectroscopy to the study of tannins inhibition of iron and steel corrosion
Authors: Jaén, Juan A.; de Obaldía, J.; Rodríguez, M. V.
Affiliation: AA(Depto. de Química Física, Universidad de Panamá, CITEN), AB(Escuela de Química, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales, Exactas y Tecnología, Universidad de Panamá), AC(Escuela de Química, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales, Exactas y Tecnología, Universidad de Panamá)
Publication: Hyperfine Interactions, Volume 202, Issue 1-3, pp. 25-38
Publication Date: 11/2011
Origin: SPRINGER
Keywords: Tannins, Corrosion inhibition, Mössbauer spectroscopy, Potentiodynamic polarization curves
Abstract Copyright: (c) 2011: Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
DOI: 10.1007/s10751-011-0337-1
Bibliographic Code: 2011HyInt.202…25J

Abstract

The inhibitory effect of tannins was investigated using, among others, potentiodynamic polarizations and Mössbauer spectroscopy. These techniques confirmed that the nature, pH and concentration of tannic solution are of upmost importance in the inhibitory properties of the solutions. It is observed that at low tannin concentration or pH, both, hydrolizable and condensed tannins, effectively inhibit iron corrosion, due to the redox properties of tannins. At pH ≈ 0, Mössbauer spectra of the frozen aqueous solutions of iron(III) with the tannin solutions showed that iron is in the form of a monomeric species [Fe(H2O)6]3 + , without coordination with the functional hydroxyl groups of the tannins. The suspended material consisted of amorphous ferric oxide and oxyhydroxides, though with quebracho tannin partly resulted in complex formation and in an iron (II) species from a redox process. Other tannins, such as chestnut hydrolysable tannins, do not complex iron at this low pH. Tannins react at high concentrations or pH (3 and 5) to form insoluble blue-black amorphous complexes of mono-and bis-type tannate complexes, with a relative amount of the bis-ferric tannate generally increasing with pH. Some Fe2 + in the form of hydrated polymeric ferrous tannate could be obtained. At pH 7, a partially hydrolyzed ferric tannate complex was also formed. The latter two phases do not provide corrosion protection. Tannin solutions at natural pH react with electrodeposited iron films (approx. 6 μm) to obtain products consisting only on the catecholate mono-complex of ferric tannate. Some aspects of the mechanism of tannins protection against corrosion are discussed.